Georgia Pioneers

Home of 8 Genealogy Websites! 700M pages of genealogy! Includes databases in: Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia!

How Studying the Construction of Railroad Bed Finds Ancestors

1866 Atlantic and Western Railroad Map While the railroad was being constructed, little towns cropped up alongside the track. The railroad houses were inhabited by those who laid rail in northwest Georgia. They were similar to shotgun houses, connecting from room to room. A railroad apartment could directly connect with another house, via panel doors. As General Sherman led his troops towards Atlanta, the Western and Atlantic Railroad transported families to Big Shanty, now Kennesaw. For those following the trail of an ancestor who worked on the railroad, it is wise to do some research on railroad history, discerning its trestles and routes during certain time periods. In some cases it may seem puzzling that an ancestor had several children, yet was never counted on the census with the family. Well, if you study the construction of railroad beds, you will start looking in other counties, or places. Eventually, he will be found listed as a railroad worker. To assist, there are a number of railroad maps posted on the internet.

Answers to our Genealogy Lie in the Wait

Immigrants boarding ships As genealogists, we quickly gather names, dates and places. But do we really understand the personal struggles of our ancestors during their presence upon the earth? For one, past generations were swamped with problems of immigration and the voyage to America. They all came for various reasons. Learning these reasons is an excellent beginning for the genealogist as it provides some interesting clues. Do we not ever-watch and observe our contemporaries to learn their route to wealth and happiness? How much more rewarding is it, then, when we learn of the history and struggles of our very own families? Sometimes we are overwhelmed. Yet never should we forget that our ancestors walked the long rutted road before us. The knowledge of how so great a task of immigrating and fighting in the War for Independence was accomplished is invaluable. It opens up a vast arena of history never before published, and unfolds like an ornate fan as new names are added.

How to Compensate for the Lost Cobb County Records

old Cobb Court HouseHave you tried the Inferior Court Minutes? This book contains a record of those called to work on roads, descriptions of places, local politics, neighbors, etc. There is a certain feel of the past when reading the entire record concerning everyone in the neighborhood. An examination of local graveyards provides even more data, and if we look closely, there are clues as to whom the daughters married. The details are important.

Captain John Collins of Acworth

Anyone who has visited the Mars Hill Presbyterian Church Cemetery in Acworth, Georgia has seen the grave of Captain John Collins. Captain John Collins At the onset of the Revolutionary War, John Collins enlisted as a private in the Militia of Captain John McAfee, Regiment of Colonel Neal to defend the South Carolina frontiers against the Cherokee Indians. His company marched to Fort Independence on the Seneca River in South Carolina and were engaged in frequent skirmishes; thence to the middle settlement of the Cherokee Nation where they defeated the Indians. During October of 1778, Collins visited the home of his father in Camden District, South Carolina and enlisted as a substitute for Moses Kemp, taking the rank of private under Captain Thomas Barron. The company marched to Brier Creek to meet General Ashe where he was stationed for two months. Then, Daniel McIntire hired him to take his place in the North Carolina Militia for three months under Captain Benjamin Harden, Colonel Charles McDowell and Lieutenant Colonel Tinning. They marched to Charlotte, North Carolina, then to Savannah, Georgia where they joined General Lincoln, then to Brier Creek and Bacon Bridge on the Ashley River for three months. He was taken prisoner at the fall of Charleston on May 12th, and paroled in Lincoln County, North Carolina. After beiing home about two months, he was taken by a parcel of Tories and carried to where Colonel Ferguson was with British, charged with violating his parole, found guilty, and sentenced to hang. But by a providential occurrence, he effected his escape, seeking refuge in army, joined the battle of Guilford. He was at the defeat of Colonel Banastre Tarleton at Cowpens, and the defeat of Ferguson at Kings Mountain. Afterwards, he went to Henry County, Virginia where he substituted for William Jones for two months and serving as Lieutenant Adjutant marched to Petersburg, Virginia, but soon driven from there by British. He was at the Battle of Jamestown then enlisted in the South Carolina Militia and marched to the Orangeburg Court House, then Four Holes Bridger then Dorchester, and Bacons Bridge. Like most immigrants to Georgia, he was in several counties in Georgia before finally setting at the Mars Hill community in Acworth.

Map of Cobb County

Field and Fireside

Cobb County plantation for sale

Gignilliat Dry Goods

Genealogy History

blog Jeannette Holland Austin
Jeannette Holland Austin Profile

Some of the Oldest Faded Documents are Readable over the Internet

Colonial Handwriting As more and more data reaches the internet for genealogists, we should be in a position to resolve some of our brick walls. Anyone could have your answers. There are still undiscovered records. Some possibilities are church records, those record books taken home by county clerks to finish their work because this was common, and church records. In my days of roaming around Georgia searching for relatives, I have seen the most amazing things passed down through the generations, including priceless european histories and genealogies of the Royal families. Sometimes such items end up in archives and public libraries, but which one? Answers come when one makes it a habit to peruse catalogs and files. And interviewing relatives should not be pushed into the background. Speaking to relatives is a grand friendship which produces unexpected information. Ideally, one should belong to all of the online websites. Because this is impractical, the advance knowledge of the content of websites are virtually important to the researcher. For this reason, my websites lists all available data to the possible subscriber before hand. Click on "databases" But it gets better, if you click on "counties" there is a complete list of all of the names of testators (of wills and estates). Although there are some books indexes of wills and estates, they are not always complete. While digitizing wills for the States of Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia, I discovered items not indexed. The reason is probably because of old colonial-style writing, faded ink, torn pages and wear and tear over the ages. By the time the court house books were microfilmed during the 1950s, they were already in a state of decay. However, the improved technology of today for imaging, microfilming and internet visibility, there is a better chance of actually reading some of the faded pages. With a little bit of study, one can usually interpret the worst documents. That is why I microfilm all possible visuals. The old colonial handwriting is best interpreted by a print-out of the document. Then a close study using a colonial handwriting-guide. First, resolve what the surname looks like in colonial handwriting. Then, other standard language. The beginning of old Wills begin with "In the Name of God, Amen" With that information, one can work out the letters. Eventually, one understands the characters and solves the puzzle. Do you hear what I am saying? Some of the oldest, most tattered records can be read today with reasonable effort. One does not have to join, in order to view the names in county wills and estates for the following States: Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. Note: } Although you do not have to join to see the names of testators in each county, Members have access to all genealogy databases for those States. JOIN HERE

Pride of the Collins

Pride of the Collins

Remember the Day?

  • When no one locked their doors?
  • We sat on the front porch counting different makes of cars? In those days models like the Cadillac coupe de ville were more glamorous.
  • Everyone had a front porch and we were invited to sip lemonade and chit chat?
  • When we acquainted ourselves with neighbors by walking the streets?
  • Saturday morning cartoons and newsreels?
  • Driveways were too narrow for anything but the Model-Ts?
  • Streets were made of cobblestone and bricks?
  • Trolleys and street car lines were draped across overhead power lines?
  • We dressed in front of coal furnaces?
  • Winter sleeping meant a stack of quilts?
  • It was too hot to sleep in summers?
  • You punched a button to turn on a single overhead light bulb?
  • Turning out lights after leaving a room to conserve electricity?
  • Going down in the basement and hauling coal upstairs in a skuttle?
  • The ice trucks which delivered a chunk of ice to the old icebox?
  • When dry cleaners delivered your pressed laundry in a van?
  • When you collected coat hangers from the neighbors and sold them for a penny each to local dry cleaners?
  • The school halloween carnival on the play ground?
  • When the whole neighborhood passed out candy on halloween.
  • When medicine bottles went unsealed and were easily opened.
  • Swimming in a pond of tadpoles and lilypads?
  • Hitching a ride on a train.
  • When Buffalo Bill brought his act to Piedmont Park in Atlanta?

Online Cobb County Wills, Estates, Marriages, Divorces, Minute Books, Military, Newspapers

Pine Run Grist Mill Cobb County was formed in 1832 from Cherokee County and named in honor of Thomas Willis Cobb, U.S. representative, U. S.Senator and Supreme Court Judge who subsequently named the the city of Marietta after his wife. For a number of years white traders settlers encroached on Indian lands. Upon the signing of the 1832 Treaty to remove the Cherokees, settlers flooded the territory. The Cherokees were farmers and not surprisingly, not all Cherokees emigrated to Oklahoma and Kansas. Some of them obtained permission to remain in Cobb County which is reflected in the Dawes Rolls when people from Cobb, Forsyth, Lumpkin and Gilmer Counties made application before the Dawes Commission to prove Indian ancestry. Such proof was necessary in order to obtain free land in Oklahoma. Indian trails ran from the Alabama Road North through Bartow County and across the "Shallow Ford" in the Chattahoochee. The Second Georgia Land Lottery of 1832 parceled out land to settlement and the first towns of Marietta, Sweet Water, Buffalo Fish and Big Shanty. Big Shanty is remembered for sheltering Atlantans during the Battle of Atlanta which made the mad rush by railroad before General Sherman took the city. The railroad started its construction in 1836 when the State of Georgia began purchasing the right-of-way to build from the Tennessee River to the Chattahoochee River. In 1845 track was laid from Marthasville to Marietta with a stop over for water at Moon's Station in Kennesaw. During the War Between the States the earliest court house records were torched by Sherman. Earliest settlers were: Cloud, Lemon, Collins, Guess, King, etc.

NOTE: The Cobb County records have not been microfilmed and are not found at the Georgia State Archives.

Probate Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers


  • Marriages 1865-1937, Groom Names A to Z
  • Marriages 1869-1886, from newspapers
  • Divorces 1885-1886 from newspapers

Online Images of Wills 1857-1904

Adams, Hiram M.;Alexander, John Y.; Alexander, Peter W.; Alexander, Robert G.; Allen, Ransom A.; Allgood, John W.; Anderson, Charles H.; Anderson, Henry S.; Anderson, Henry S.; Anderson, William P.; Armstrong, William; Atkins, Emeret; Austin, William A.; Avery, George S.; Awtrey, Merrill C.; Awtry, Sarah; Baggett, Burton; Bagwell, John B.; Baker, Francis J.; Barrett. Charles; Barrett, John; Baswell, William P.; Bates, Mathias; Bellenger, John; Bennett, John H;. Bingham, S. A.; Bolan, Matilda C.; Bonner, Claborn; Boyd, David; Boyd, Robert M.; Bradley, Gordon M.; Branan, Sarah; Brinkley, Emeline F.; Brockman, John B.; Brockman, John B.; Brown, Absalom; Brown, James R; Brown, James Welsman; Brown, Silas; Bullard, Robert L;. Buttolph, Wallace S.; Bunn, Marcus; Burnap, Gaines C.; Bush, Asa; Byrd, Sarah N.; Cargile, James; Carrie, Gaspard T.; Chastain, Sarah C;. Chastain, Sarah C.; Cheney, Andrew J.; Cheney, W. S.; Clark, Jane; Clarke, Susan Stone; Clay, Thomas C;. Cochran, S. R.; Cole, Henry G.; Cook, Francis; Cooke, N. M.; Cortelyon, Peter R.; Couper, Hannah Page; Cowen, Stephen D.; Crockett, M. Ella; Crosby, Charles M.; Covington, W. H.; Cumming, William Henry; Curry, Rebecca; Daniell, Robert; Darby, John; Darby, Mary Francis; Davis, Gary; Delk, Jackson; Delk, W. J.; Dempsey, Lazarus; Dickeson, John; Dickson, David; Dobbs, David; Dobbs, David Tudson; Dobbs, James P.; Dobbs, Wiat; Dobbs, William M.; Dodd, Peter S.; Dodgen, George N.; Dodgen, John L.; Dunwoody, Ellen C.; Drake, Cargile; Duke, Augustus Newton; Dunaway, Ellen C.; Duncan, Martha Berrien; Edwards, Allen C;. Edwards, Simeon; Emanuel, David; Esler, Sarah Este, William Miller Eubanks, Joseph Fannin, Benjamin Faw, Enoch; Fenn, Susan Emeline; Florence, William; Fowler, George T.; Fridell, John L.; Fuller, W. G.; Gantt, Joseph; Gappins, Jordan; Gibson, Isham R.; Gignilliat, Harrietta; Gignilliat, Norman P.; Gignilliat, William R.; Glore, George W.; Glover, J. B., Jr.; Goss, Isham Jabez Marshall; Goulding, Matilda R.; Gragg, John; Gray, Eliza A.; Green, Clara I.; Green, Clotilda; Green, Joel A.; Green, William C., Sr.; Gresham, George W.; Gresham, Watson; Groover, Jacob N.; Groves, William F.; Gunnell, W B.; Gunter, David; Hamby, T. K.; Hardage, George Washington; Harden, Robert R.; Hargrove, Asbury; Harkness, Amanda K.; Harlow, Cynthia A.; Harrington, Jackson; Harrison, Maria S.; Heggie, Carrie E.; Hembree, Samuel; Hembree, Warren W.; Hill, John W.; Hinton, Mary H.; Hinton, Rosina L.; Hirsch, Rapheal; Hogan, Mary; Holcombe, Jabez J.; Hopkins, Henry J.; House, Francis C.; House, Henry; House, Jacob G.; House, William; Hoy, Andrew C.; Hughes, James G.; Humphrey, Richard; Humphries, J. R., Dr.; Hunt, Elisha; Husk, Martha L.; Inzer, Mark P.; Irvine, Susan E.; Jackson, H. C.; Jackson, Shadrach; Johnston, William M.; Jones, Samuel; Jordan, William M.; Julian, Samuel; Kelpen, William; Kemp, Alsey; Kemp, Burrell; Kemp, James Starling; Kemp, Solomon; Kimberly, J. E.; King, Francis P., Mrs.; Kirk, John, Sr.; Kiser, John; Knight, Hattie H.; Knight, Rachael Susannah; Kolb, Valentine; Lacy, Edna; Lane, Caroline T.; Lane, Matilda B.; Lanneau, John F.; Lemon, Robert; Lemon, William; Lewis, John; Lindley, John B.; Lindley, John T.; Lindley, Jonathan; Lindley, Thomas; Linton, Elizabeth W.; Litchfield, Elizabeth; Litchfield, L. A.; Lyle, Hugh G.; Lyle, Nancy S.; Mable, Robert; MacLeod, Mary A.; Maner, Alfred; Marchman, Roswell H.; Mayes, Elizabeth; Mayes, Harvey M.; Mayson, George W.; Maxwell, Sarah L.; McCannell, James; McCowes, Anna William; McDonald, Eliza; McDonald, James J.; McEarchen, David N.; McEver, John L.; McElreath, John M.; McHan, Barney; McGee, Fletcher M.; McKee, Isaac M.; McLain, Charles P.; McMullan, Willis; Medlock, E. W.; Miller, George A.; Minhinnett, Francis R.; Mitchell, Hardy; Monk, James G.; Moon, Thomas J.; Moore, J. C.; Morgan, David; Morris, Thompson; Moulden, John; Myers, John M.; Neese, Alfred M.; Nesbitt, Mary Ann; Newell, D. J.; Nichols, Fannie; Nichols, William T.; Northcutt, Alfred M.; Northcutt, Jesse J.; Oliver, Peter M.; Orr, William E.; Owen, Hiram; Pace, Russell; Paden, Robert S.; Paige, Joseph; Paige, Sarah C.; Penn, Benjamin J.; Phillips, Mathew M.; Pilgrim, Durrill; Pool, Elzy W.; Pomeroy, Edgar J.; Powder, John H.; Prather, Patrick H.; Pratt, Nathaniel A.; Pritchett, Robert A.; Pruett, Ittai; Ray, Emanuel; Reagin, Robert L.; Reed, Joel B.; Reed, William B.; Reid, Andrew J.; Reid, Eliza Melita; Reynolds, Aristides; Rice, James; Robarts, Elizer G.; Roberts, John; Robertson, Elvina; Robertson, John; Robertson, Samuel; Robinson, William; Rogers, Charles; Rood, Asel P.; Rooney, T. A.; Ruff, Martain Lenkin; Russell, Mattie V.; Sauges, John R.; Scott, Mary A.; Scott, Mary A.; Scribner, Sarah J.; Scroggins, James F.; Sessions, W. M.; Sewell, Joseph W.; Sewell, Terrell R.; Seymore, B. W.; Shaw, Sarah E.; Shearer, George; Sibley, Emma E.; Simpson, Marianne H.; Slaughter, Sarah; Smith, A., Dr.; Smith, Ann M.; Smith, Anna Marie; Smith, A. S.; Smith, Hannah Moore; Smith, James O.; Smith, Mary Perkinson; Smith, Minervia A.; Smith, Morgan; Smith, Sarah; Smith, Tillman; Smith, Zachariah; Stephens, Dorothy; Stephens, Timothy; Stephens, William P.; Stewart, Eliza Pooler; Stewart, Susan M.; & Theophilus S.; Stewart, Theophilus S.; Stocks, Mary Lou; Strange, James W.; Taylor, Isaac; Terry, Alfred; Thomas, K. H.; Tippin, David J.; Trammell, Leander N.; Trezevant, Elizabeth C.; Turner, John H.; Turner, William B.; Varner, Matthew; Vincent, Naomy; Waddell, Medora N.; Wall, Ann Ross; Wallace, Campbell; Wallis, Josiah; Waterman, Thomas; Way, Amos L.; Wayland, Harriet H.; Welch, Henry L.; West, Irena; Westfield, Eliza; Whedbee, Susan; Whitefield, Thomas W.; Whitfield, Benjamin H.; Whitfield, David H.; Williams, Johnson; Williamson, Martha; Winn, Hilliard W.; Winn, Lavenia A.; Winn, William T.; Winn, Will J.; Winters, John R.; Wright, Dotson B.; Wright, Martha G.; Yale, D. E.; York, Augustus W.

Online Images of Minute Book A (Estates) 1865-1873

Baker, Charles Baker, John G. Bellinger, John Bennett, John
Boyd, Israel P Boyd, Robert M. Byrd, Margaret Bullard, Micajah
Camp, Benjamin T. Campbell, Newport H. Chappell, John Collins, James A. C.
Cowan, Francis M. Davenport, Marcus L. Dickson, Mary E. and David, orphans of David W. Dobb, Rosalinda
Donehoo, Cornelius T. DuPre, A. N. Durham, Lacy W. Dutton, D. S.
Eason, Rebecca M., orphan of Rasberry Emanuel, David Gann, Edward
Gray, Daniel S. Gresham, Watson Gresham, William Haney, William
Hembree, S. G. Gober, John Hairston, Thomas J. Hamby, D. C., orphans of
Hansell, Andrew J. Harbin, Richard Hartfield, James H., minor of James H.
Hembree, Sanford Hembree, S. G. Hembree, Warren Henry, Andrew J.
House, John Howell, Clement C. Howell, Isaac Howell, M. S.
Kemp, Solomon King, Barrington King, Thomas E. Kirk, George
Kirk, John Lane, Caroline T. Lane, Montgomery, Henry F., Anna W. and Charles M., orphans of Mark Lane
Latimer, Hezekiah R. Layman, Julia and Hannah, orphans Leavell, Edward F. Lemon, William, guardian of his children
Loveless, James Maloney, Robert Manning, Ambrose Manning, Simpson
McAfee, Benjamin McClain, Pemela, guardian of her children McConnell, Mary, orphan of Joseph S. McConnell, Wiley
McGinty, Henry C., Martha E. and Helen V., orphans of H. E. McLarty, S. T. Miller, George A. Montgomery, James F., orphans of
Moore, Jeremiah A. Morris, George, minor orphan Moseley, Elizabeth Nesbit, Mary
Ormsby, Theodore D. Pace, Hardy Palmer, William J., guardian of his children
Pickins, R. H. Rakestraw, William Randolph, John Ray, John
Reed, Daniel Reeves, William E. F. Reid, Andrew J. Reid, Daniel
Robinson, John Rutherford, William Scoggins, Charles, orphan Simpson, L. A.
Slotterbeck, A. J. Smith, Benjamin Smith,Morgin
Stansell, David Strickland, James Summerlin, W. L. Turner, Mitchell D.
Turner, Mahuldah Varner, Matthew Wallace, William Waterman, Thomas S.
Wells, W. S. Williamson, James B. Wright, Thornton Whedbee, Susan

A List of original estates and wills available at the Cobb County Court House (folders) 1865 to 1925

Names: Hammie Abbott, J. M. Abbott, Levi Abbott, Henry Abercrombie, George W. Adair, G. W. Adair, J. F. Adair, Paul and Hazel Adair, Francis Adams, F. W. Adams (1878), H. M. Adams (1897), John Adams, H. S. Adams, minor (1872), Mary Adams, May E. Adams (1875), minor, Melisa Adams (1900), Mrs. P. A. Adams, W. B. Adams, W. E. Adams, R. J. Agricola, Jane Brown Akin, Fannie Alden, Ellenor Aldridge (1880), Charles C. Allen (1894), Eliza Allen, Jo. Allen, R. A. Allen (1878), Ransom Allen; Collins, John (estate)(image)(1852)


  • Photographs of Early Settlers
  • Cobb County Legal Advertising

Military Records

  • Cobb County World War II Military Registrants
  • Cobb County Military Registrants for the Draft, World War II

Church Records

  • Concord Baptist Church Membership Roll 1832 to 1883
  • Mars Hill Presbyterian Church, Acworth, Registry, 1837-1874

Tax Digests

  • 1848
  • 1849
  • 1851

Images of Newspapers (select issues)

  • Field and Fireside
  • Marietta Daily Journal 1868 to 1870


  • Map of Indian Trails

Traced Genealogies of Cobb County Families

Anderson; Autry; Bullard; Cleveland; Cowan; Gignilliat; Gober; Goodson; Griggs; Grogan; Hansell; Harget; Howell; James; McMinn; Mullins; Power; Voss