Georgia Pioneers


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The Historical Past Reveals What Happens Today

Washington Crossing the Delaware You have doubtless heard the expression that "nothing is new under the sun?" Understanding today involves knowing yesterday. The modern age has suffered a re-writing of school history books. This is unfortunate, because the writers were not present at the events, nor alive. That means that the modern version of the past is "opinion" or "propaganda". That leaves the task to us of teaching historical subjects to our children. But this easy for genealogists who researches every detail of the ancestor's lifestyle and the surrounding events, such as immigration and wars. He reads pensions from the Civil War and Revolutionary War, and learns of the movement of troops and details of battle. He appreciates that muskets, sabres and rifles were used to defend the families during war and against the Indians at frontier forts. He follows the ancestors as they took up land grants, drew in the land lotteries, land bounties to settle mountain lands, the movement westward and battles with Indians. He reads civil war diaries and the diaries of white women taken as Indian slaves in the Alleghany Mountains and dragged into villages further westward. And, as the history of each family is discovered, the genealogist shares the factual information with others. More of these stories need to be passed along in families. Lest we forget!

The Difficult Issues of Census Records

Census Records One would think that everyone got counted by the census taker, but this was not always true. For example, a decision had to be made about the persons who owned houses or farms on county lines. And that decision was which county should obtain the information. Beginning in 1790, practically nothing was established except the name of the head of household. How many William Smith's did you have in the same county from the age of 16 to 26 and what does that tell you? The Georgia 1790 census did not survive, and presumably burned during the War of 1812. The age ranges of the children improve somewhat from 1800 to 1840, however, you are still guessing the names of these children. Therefore, accurate research results do not begin until the 1850 census which lists all members of the household, names, ages, where born. This is discouraging to the genealogist who wishes to dig deeper. That leaves the county records, a much in all genealogical data. Old wills, estate and marriage records are available for viewing on Georgia Pioneers or you can travel to the Georgia State Archives in Morrow, Georgia and examine the microfilm.
Map of Campbell County


Genealogy History

blog Jeannette Holland Austin
Jeannette Holland Austin Profile
Remember the Day? Remember...
  • When no one locked their doors?
  • We sat on the front porch counting different makes of cars? In those days models like the Cadillac coupe de ville were more glamorous.
  • Everyone had a front porch and we were invited to sip lemonade and chit chat?
  • When we acquainted ourselves with neighbors by walking the streets?
  • Saturday morning cartoons and newsreels?
  • Driveways were too narrow for anything but the Model-Ts?
  • Streets were made of cobblestone and bricks?
  • Trolleys and street car lines were draped across overhead power lines?
  • We dressed in front of coal furnaces?
  • Winter sleeping meant a stack of quilts?
  • It was too hot to sleep in summers?
  • You punched a button to turn on a single overhead light bulb?
  • Turning out lights after leaving a room to conserve electricity?
  • Going down in the basement and hauling coal upstairs in a skuttle?
  • The ice trucks which delivered a chunk of ice to the old icebox?
  • When dry cleaners delivered your pressed laundry in a van?
  • When you collected coat hangers from the neighbors and sold them for a penny each to local dry cleaners?
  • The school halloween carnival on the play ground?
  • When the whole neighborhood passed out candy on halloween.
  • When medicine bottles went unsealed and were easily opened.
  • Swimming in a pond of tadpoles and lilypads?
  • Hitching a ride on a train.
Campbellton

Campbell County Georgia marker

Georgia Countryside


Campbell County Genealogy, Wills

Old Campbell County Court House Campbell County was formed by an act of the Georgia Legislature December 20, 1828 taking land from Carroll, Coweta, DeKalb, and Fayette Counties. During 1832 land from the Cherokee Land Lottery was added, for a total to about 192 square miles. On October 17, 1870 the land lying north of the river was taken along with some of eastern Carroll to form what is now Douglas County. The rest merged with Fulton on January 1, 1932. Campbell County was named in honor of Colonel Duncan G. Campbell. He and James Meriwether negotiated the Indian Springs Treaty in which the Creek Indian land was ceded on February 12, 1825. The County seat was Campbellton until 1870. It was then moved to Fairburn where it remained for the life of the county. The county existed from 1828 to 1931 when it was finally merged into Fulton County.

Campbell County Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers

OnlineImages of Campbell County Wills 1833 to 1862

Testators: Abercrombie, Joseph;Barge, Richmond;Beavers, William;Black, Thomas;Bomar, Armsted;Bomar, William; Brazeal, Britton; Brock, John; Camp, Alfred; Camp, Joseph; Camp, Thomas; Childs, Sarah; Clackler, Henry; Clinton, John; Clinton, William; Coryell, Thomas;Darnell, David;Davenport, Dicey;Demoney, John; Dillon, Thomas;Doggett, Thomas;Duggan, Jesse;Dunlap, James;English, William;Faulkner, Peter;Gentry, John;Gibson, Clary;Head, Benjamin;Heath, Ebenetus;Hinton, Jacob;Hobgood, Lewis;Howell, Joseph;James, Stephen Sr.; Jones, James;Kolb, Martin;Little, John;Longino, Ruth;Mayfield, Jacob;McClarty, John;McKoy, James;McKoy, Thomas;Menefee, Willis;Miller, Jacob; Miller, Robert;Morgan, Willis;Parker, John;Paulett, Richard; Phillips, Levi;Rainey, Thomas;Redwine, John;Roberts, Grant; Roberts, Wiley;Rowen, Hugh;Rutledge, Albert;Smart, Elisha; Smith, Sarah;Strawn, Absalom;Thompson, Edmund;Tomberlin, John; Whitten, Gideon;Wilkerson, Robert;Wilson, John;Winn, Francis; Wynn, John;Yarbrough, Joshua

Campbell County Will Abstracts (1831-1908)

Indexes to Probate Records

Index to Annual Returns Book B 1843 to 1851
Index to Annual Returns Book D 1854 to 1858
Index to Will Book B 1863 to 1922
Index to Will Book C 1923 to 1933
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Georgia Wills

Traced Genealogies: Campbell County Families

James Smith