Georgia Pioneers



Gilmer County Probate Records, Wills, Estates

Ellijay, Georgia Gilmer County was created from Cherokee County on Dec. 3, 1832 by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1832, p. 56). Early settlers: Joseph Anderson, William A. Barrows, Jessee Charles, John A. Davis, E. T. Foote, John Fouts, John Goble, Lindsay Harper, Jesse Jarrett, P. H. Kennesaw, Robert Orr, Joshua Mooney, Daniel Quillian, Joseph Slate, D. F. Tankersley, Silas Whitaker and Aldred Young.

Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers

Marriages Indexes to Probate Records Digital Images of Gilmer County Wills and Estates, Book B (1836-1854).
Names of testators: Alexander, Robert, orphans of
Alexander, Robert
Barnes, Brinsley
Burch, John
Chastain orphans
Collins, Wiley
Dickey, George
Dickey, John
Ellington, William, estate
Ellington, orphans
Ellington, orphans, Annual Returns of
Fincannon, W. M., LWT (1910)
James, Sharud
Johnson, orphan
Jones, James
Kincade, James
Mashburn, Thomas
Moreland, John, orphans of
Pence, Absalom
Pritchett, Gilbert
Rawlston, David
Reid, William
Smith, Enoch
Tate, John
Wakefield, Charles
Whitmire, William
Wilkins, Isaac
Williams, Greif





The Moonshiner King
By Jeannette Holland Austin
Jeannette Holland Austin
"Ayres Jones was a character. Lieutenant McIntyre of the United States Army was killed while assisting US deputy marshals to raid a Gilmer County in the spring of 1878. There was a mystery about the killing of McIntyre which needed clearing up. At the time, it was thought that Ayres Jones and his brother were guilty of this killing. For months, deputies sought out Ayres Jones and his brother, to bring them to trial. They lived in the wildest and most thinly populated portion of Georgia, and knew the mountain paths well, so they were able to elude and defy arrest. About a year after McIntyre was killed, however, the Jones brothers were captured by a bold plot to share them, planned by Deputy Marshal J. B. Gaston and two assistants. When the brothers were brought into Atlanta, they looked more like wild men than dwellers in a civilized community, having long, wiry, black hair which fell loosely over their shoulders, and thick beards. The brothers were gaints in form and their eyes had a ferocious, but furtive glance, which betrayed their fiery nature.

Moonshine Still
Moonshine Still near Ellijay, Georgia.

The United States District Court tried them, but they were acquitted because of lack of evidence to connect them with the MyIntyre murder. Upon their release, they returned to Gilmer County, but did not settle in the old places. The glimpse they had gotten of the civilized world upset their former habits. Before catpure, they had never seen a locomotive and knew nothing of the ways of the world. From mountain desperadoes, they were converted into wily moonshiners, who depended on cunning more than reckless behavior.

But it was not too long before Ayres Jones and his brother were heard of again, not in connection with the homicide, but as crafty and successful evaders of the revenue detectives who sought out the dens of mountain moonshiners. Warrant after warrant was produced, but they could not be found. As they fled from place to place, reports were received of their being from all parts of the north Georgia mountains. Eventually, Ayres Jones was heard of as being in Chattooga County. Marshall Nelms sent Deputies E. C. Murphy, William Killy, and H. C. Garrison to capture them. After being gone a week, they discovered that the gang of moonshiners had spread among people who refused to provide information." Ref: The Constitution, Atlanta 8-18-1885

Map of Gilmer County Georgia

See how Easy it is to read old Wills online
William Hall
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Gilmer Co. Court House Ellijay, Georgia
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