Georgia Pioneers



Campbell County Wills, Estates, Court House Records

Old Campbell County Court House Campbell County was formed by an act of the Georgia Legislature December 20, 1828 taking land from Carroll, Coweta, DeKalb, and Fayette Counties. During 1832 land from the Cherokee Land Lottery was added, for a total to about 192 square miles. On October 17, 1870 the land lying north of the river was taken along with some of eastern Carroll to form what is now Douglas County. The rest merged with Fulton on January 1, 1932. Campbell County was named in honor of Colonel Duncan G. Campbell. He and James Meriwether negotiated the Indian Springs Treaty in which the Creek Indian land was ceded on February 12, 1825. The County seat was Campbellton until 1870. It was then moved to Fairburn where it remained for the life of the county. The county existed from 1828 to 1931 when it was finally merged into Fulton County.

Campbell County Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers

Images of Campbell County Wills 1833 to 1862
Testators: Abercrombie, Joseph;Barge, Richmond;Beavers, William;Black, Thomas;Bomar, Armsted;Bomar, William; Brazeal, Britton; Brock, John; Camp, Alfred; Camp, Joseph; Camp, Thomas; Childs, Sarah; Clackler, Henry; Clinton, John; Clinton, William; Coryell, Thomas;Darnell, David;Davenport, Dicey;Demoney, John; Dillon, Thomas;Doggett, Thomas;Duggan, Jesse;Dunlap, James;English, William;Faulkner, Peter;Gentry, John;Gibson, Clary;Head, Benjamin;Heath, Ebenetus;Hinton, Jacob;Hobgood, Lewis;Howell, Joseph;James, Stephen Sr.; Jones, James;Kolb, Martin;Little, John;Longino, Ruth;Mayfield, Jacob;McClarty, John;McKoy, James;McKoy, Thomas;Menefee, Willis;Miller, Jacob; Miller, Robert;Morgan, Willis;Parker, John;Paulett, Richard; Phillips, Levi;Rainey, Thomas;Redwine, John;Roberts, Grant; Roberts, Wiley;Rowen, Hugh;Rutledge, Albert;Smart, Elisha; Smith, Sarah;Strawn, Absalom;Thompson, Edmund;Tomberlin, John; Whitten, Gideon;Wilkerson, Robert;Wilson, John;Winn, Francis; Wynn, John;Yarbrough, Joshua
Campbell County Will Abstracts (1831-1908)

Indexes to Probate Records

Index to Campbell County Annual Returns Book B 1843 to 1851
Index to Campbell County Annual Returns Book D 1854 to 1858
Index to Campbell County Will Book B 1863 to 1922
Index to Campbell County Will Book C 1923 to 1933

The Difficult Issues of Census Records
By Jeannette Holland Austin
Jeannette Holland Austin
You would think that everyone got counted by the census taker, but this was not always true. For example, a decision had to be made about the persons who owned houses or farms on county lines. And that decision was which county should obtain the information. Beginning in 1790, practically nothing was established except the name of the head of household. How many William Smith's did you have in the same county from the age of 16 to 26 and what does that tell you? The Georgia 1790 census did not survive, and presumably burned during the War of 1812. The age ranges of the children improve somewhat from 1800 to 1840, however, you are still guessing the names of these children. Therefore, accurate research results do not begin until the 1850 census which lists all members of the household, names, ages, where born. This is discouraging to the genealogist who wishes to dig deeper. That leaves the county records, a much in all genealogical data. Old wills, estate and marriage records are available for viewing on Georgia Pioneers or you can travel to the Georgia State Archives in Morrow, Georgia and examine the microfilm.

Census Records


Map of Campbell County


See how Easy it is to read old Wills online
William Hall
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Campbellton Campbell County Georgia marker