Georgia Pioneers




Genealogy History

blog Jeannette Holland Austin
Jeannette Holland Austin Profile


Elusive Ancestors


Wagon TrainTo establish facts for elusive ancestors when the records are seemingly void of information is tough. One solution is to research around the facts and thus eliminate persons in that generation. We need to know who is who and add them to a family group sheet irregardless of whether or not they are directly related. This process documents a family and eliminates them. First, locate your ancestor's surname in nearby counties and states. Then search court house records, viz: deeds, wills, tax records, estates, etc. and establish the facts for each person. Next, complete a family group sheet on that family, noting the sources you used. Proceed accordingly on all questionable families, thus identifying each person of the era and location. Third, examine each family group sheet. Look for nicknames. For example, Betsy, b. ca 1757 could be your Elizabeth, b. 1759. Fourth, once everyone is identified you probably have a number of loose persons for whom you need to discover more information. Try to trace that person so that he may be either identified or eliminated; use marriage records, estates, etc. In the earliest pioneering days the eldest son inherited the farm while others went into other acceptable occupations such as physicians, ministers, etc. This took them away from the home place. In other words, erase confusion by identifying and eliminating all families in prescribed areas having your same.


Map of Bulloch County

The Path to Truth is Independent Research

Lord Dunmore's War In this day and age, when media cannot be wholly trusted, one is compelled to do independent research. I have always worked within the framework of digging for old documents, such as county wills and estates, as well as immigration records, census, church, cemeteries, and the like. This is what genealogist do. My previous research disclosed that some genealogists working on the same lineage had the notion that William Franklin enlisted in the Revolutionary War while in Botetourt County, Virginia. Discovering the actual truth came from his name being listed on the 1774 muster roll of Capt. Love's Militia Company in Botetourt County. Since the revolutionary war did not begin until 1776, I decided to see what was happening in the Alleghany Mountains during that time period. Here is what I found. During October of 1774, Botetourt County sent two militia companies down the Mississippi River to the Falls of Ohio to fight the waring Shawnee and other tribes. When they arrived, the Shawnee were ready to fight and the result was a bloody battle of dead and wounded on both sides. Although Lord Dunmore had order all of the Virginia militia out, the two companies of Botetourt militia were the first to arrive and as they crossed the falls (into Indiana) the Shawnee awaited battle. Franklin was listed as "wounded" and "released" two days later. This was not the revolutionary war, rather Lord Dunmore's War of one day in 1774 which resulted in a treaty from the Shawnee and several other tribes relinquishing lands in the Virginia mountains. After further investigation, it was learned that common problem during that time was that Indians scalped white men and took their women into slavery, But there was more truth to be discovered. Six years later, Franklin left Botetourt County and went to North Carolina where he joined the revolutionary war forces of General Lighthorse Harry Lee. Given that Franklin was awarded over 1000 acres of land in Warren County, Georgia for his service further established his full participation in all of the battles from then until the end of the war. A simple fact provided the truth. That is, he was with General Lee until the end, and it was the general who signed his certificate. Had I accepted the work of other probing genealogists, I would have never found the actual reality of his service as an Indian fighter and patriot.

Georgia Countryside









Bulloch County Wills, Estates, Marriages



Statesboro, Georgia

Bulloch County was created from Bryan and Screven countiesin 1796 by an act of the General Assembly. It was named for Archibald Bulloch, Georgia's first provisional governor (1776-1777). Portions of Bulloch County were used to create Jenkins County (1905), Candler County (1914), and Evans County (1914). Researchers of Bulloch County should also research Chatham County.

Probate Records available to Members of Georgia Pioneers

Bulloch County Wills 1854-1861 (abstracts)
Bulloch County Marriages 1796-1850
Minutes of Upper Black Creek Church, Brooklet, 1832 members
Index to Bulloch County Inventories and Appraisements (1795-1900)
Index to Bulloch County Annual Returns (1795-1900)
Index to Bulloch County Wills (1795-1900)
Index to Bulloch County Marriages (1795-1900)
Index to Bulloch County Miscellaneous Estate Records (1795-1900)
Index to Bulloch County Receipts from the Heirs and other principals to the Estates
Ordinarys of the Probate Court of Bulloch County
Sheriffs of Bulloch County
Clerks of the Court of Ordinary of Bulloch County

Miscellanous Wills and Estates (Images)
Deloach, John. LWT 1888
Wright, William, Estate, 1843

Where to Purchase Books by Jeannette Holland Austin

Georgia Bible Records by Jeannette Holland Austin
The Georgia Frontier, 3 volumes, by Jeannette Holland Austin
Georgia Intestate Records by Jeannette Holland Austin
The Georgians by Jeannette Holland Austin

Index to Georgia Wills by Jeannette Holland Austin
30,638 Burials in Georgia by Jeannette Holland Austin