Georgia Pioneers




Genealogy History

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Jeannette Holland Austin Profile


When Local Militia Protected Communities

Militia Companies

Before America was a centralized government, county militia companies were formed to protect its citizens. As new land was settled, there an inherent need to protect people against the various Indian tribes. In fact, rampart hostilities existed up until the time of the Revolutionary War. As settlements moved from East to West, the mountains were occupied by a number of waring Indians who regularly scalped white men and took their women as slaves. Hence, every male 21 years and upwards was expected to join the militia, and they did so willingly. At the onset of the Revolutionary War, the militia companies joined the fight of the rebels, especially while the British occupied Charleston, Savannah and Augusta. While these guys were not part of the Continental Army, they worked with the Continentals under General Greene in and about Georgia and South Carolina in helping to distract the British occupation. Then, during the War Between the States, militia once again took up its rifles to go to war. Prewar militia companies soon became regiments in the Union and Confederate Armies.

Answers from Old Records

William Hall The family history is told in old records at the court house. The places to search range from deeds to house and lands, tax digests (including default tax payers), land lotteries, marriages, licenses, maps, estates of every sort including the last wills and testaments, pension affidavits of civil war, and the first and second world wars, revolutionary war, lists of indigent persons, orphans, the poor house and on and on. Let no leaf go turned upward. Georgia Pioneers is helping the researcher by adding many county records online. Check it out!


Map of Brooks County






Brooks County Wills, Annual Returns, Bills of Sale, Confederate Pensions


Brooks County Brooks County was created in December of 1858 from Lowndes and Thomas Counties. The first court session was held in the home of Thomas Folsom in Quitman. Later in 1859, work began on a court house, however was not finished until 1864. One of the earliest settlers was John Groover, a descendant of Peter Gruber, Saltzburger to Georgia with Oglethorpe, who settler in Ebenezer, Georgia (Effingham County) and whose descendants went to Bulloch and Brooks Counties. Other early settlers were: Levin Arrington, Benjamin Bentley, William Colter, William Dinson, John Edmonson, William G. Hunter, Robert Peacock, Daniel McRae and Leary Stanley.

Wills and Estates available to Members of Georgia Pioneers

Indexes to Probate Records
  • Wills, Book I, 1860 to 1899
  • Annual Returns, Bills of Sale, Vouchers, 1859 to 1863
  • Annual Returns, Bills of Sale, Vouchers, 1863 to 1865
  • Will Book I, 1860 to 1899
  • Annual Returns, Bills of Sale, Vouchers, Book D, 1869 to 1872
Digital Images of Last Wills and Testaments 1860 to 1871
  • Bentley, Benjamin
  • Copeland, L. J.
  • Coulter, William
  • Denson, William
  • Dixon, Pleasant
  • Edmonson, John
  • Edwards, Samuel
  • Gorno, Joel
  • Groover, Charles
  • Groover, John (Estate) 1857-1860
  • Groover, Joshua
  • Hunter, William
  • King, Nancy
  • McCardle, James
  • McLeod, Norman
  • McMullen, John
  • McRae, Daniel
  • Mullen, James
  • Mullen, James
  • Oliff, Elizabeth
  • Patrick, William
  • Patterson, Frances
  • Peacock, Robert
  • Ramsey, Owen
  • Redding, Elkanah
  • Rizer, Charles
  • Rogers, Thomas
  • Slaughter, Thomas
  • Speight, William
  • Stanley, Mary
  • Strickland,Abraham
  • Thigpen, Sarah
  • Yates, Morgan
  • Young, Mathew
  • Wade, Thomas
  • Walker, James
  • Walker, Joseph
  • Walker, Sarah
  • Williams, John
  • Williams, Thomas
  • Wilson, Jeremiah


Civil War
  • Confederate Pensions of Soldiers and Widows

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See how easy it is to view Wills, Estates, Inventories, Returns, Sales online

Georgia Wills

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